3-mile-wide Australian meteorite crater formed 100 million years ago

A massive three-mile-wide meteorite crater formed about 100 million years ago was discovered by a gold mine in the Australian Outback.

  • Meteorite crater discovery in Western Australia’s Outback
  • The crater stretches for three miles and was formed 100 million years ago.
  • The team found a bud cone on the site, a sign of a meteorite impact.
  • It is formed from high-pressure, high-speed shock waves generated by objects subjected to large impacts.

Gold miners stumbled across a massive meteorite crater that was created about 100 million years ago in the Western Australian Outback.

Using electromagnetic irradiation, the researchers were able to create an image of a collision site called Ora Banda Crater beneath the surface to see if it stretched over three miles.

The shoot cone was recovered from Earth formed from high-pressure high-speed shock waves (‘signs of meteorite impact’) generated by large impacting objects.

Ancient plant material has also been found in the sediment, and we will further analyze the fine pollen to collect the exact date the hole was filled.

Gold miners stumbled across a massive meteorite crater that was created about 100 million years ago in the Western Australian Outback. Using electromagnetic irradiation, researchers were able to create an image of the impact site beneath the surface to see if it stretched over three miles.

When miners were working near the historic Goldfields mining town Ora Banda in the northwest of Kalgoorlie-Boulder, they found rock formations that were invisible in place.

Geologist and geophysicist Dr. Jayson Meyers said: ‘The Aura Banda Crater was a little gift.’

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‘The geologists who were studying it were drilling a hole in gold, and they saw a very peculiar rock.’

‘They thought deeply that this did not fit anything else they had seen and thought this could be the result of a meteorite impact.’

Bud cones formed from high-pressure, high-speed shock waves ('signs of meteorite impact') generated by large colliding objects were recovered from the site.

Bud cones formed from high-pressure, high-speed shock waves (‘signs of meteorite impact’) generated by large colliding objects were recovered from the site.

Miners were working near Ora Banda, the historic Goldfields mining town northwest of Kalgoorlie-Boulder, where they found an invisible rock in place.

Miners were working near Ora Banda, the historic Goldfields mining town northwest of Kalgoorlie-Boulder, where they found an invisible rock in place.

He said alphabet ‘Based on its location and the level of erosion and some soil filling the flanks, we estimate it could be about 100 million years old.’

The research team has found sediments from ancient plant material that paleontologists look for microscopic pollen that can reveal when the box is filled.

Curtin University is supporting Meyers and will look into glass droplets along with zircons and other minerals bonded to the bud cone to determine the exact date the collision occurred.

The team estimates that the crater is 100 million years old, but said it would have happened between 250 and 40 million years ago.

Zircons and other materials deep in the vaporized and recrystallized pores can also glow when an event occurs. resource.ly report.

Meyers told resource.ly,’The energy released when an asteroid hits would have been more than the combined energy gained from all the atomic tests conducted so far.

Ancient plant material has also been found in the sediment, and it is further analyzed for fine pollen to collect the exact date the hole was filled.

Ancient plant material has also been found in the sediment, and it is further analyzed for fine pollen to collect the exact date the hole was filled.

However, the Or Banda crater is five times larger than Australia's famous Wolfe Creek crater, located in the northern part of the state. Wolf Creek was formed by a meteorite that was estimated to have hit Earth 300,000 years ago.

However, the Or Banda crater is five times larger than Australia’s famous Wolfe Creek crater, located in the northern part of the state. Wolf Creek was formed by a meteorite that was estimated to have hit Earth 300,000 years ago.

Had this crater hit the Cretaceous period, it would not have affected the era of dinosaurs. During the Dinosaur Age, it became a victim of an asteroid that left an approximately 90-mile impact crater on the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico, about 66 million years ago.

However, the Or Banda crater is five times larger than Australia’s famous Wolfe Creek crater, located in the northern part of the state.

Wolf Creek was formed by a meteorite that was estimated to have hit Earth 300,000 years ago.

The meteorite left a huge 2,890-foot hole in the ground visible from the surface.

And it was considered the second largest crater in the world.

Kill Dinosaurs: How the city-sized celestial body removed 75% of all animal and plant species

About 65 million years ago, non-avian dinosaurs became extinct and more than half of the world’s species were extinct.

This mass extinction paved the way for the rise of mammals and the emergence of humans.

The Chicxulub asteroid is often cited as a potential cause of the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event.

The asteroid has hit a shallow sea in the Gulf of Mexico now.

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The impact triggered global climate change by releasing huge clouds of dust and soot, extinct 75% of all plant and animal species.

Researchers argue that the soot needed for such a global catastrophe could have had a direct impact on rocks in shallow waters, especially around Mexico, rich in hydrocarbons.

Experts believe that within 10 hours of the shock, a huge tsunami swept the Gulf Coast.

About 65 million years ago, non-avian dinosaurs became extinct and more than half of the world's species were extinct. The Chicxulub asteroid is often cited as a potential cause of the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event (stock image).

About 65 million years ago, non-avian dinosaurs became extinct and more than half of the world’s species were extinct. The Chicxulub asteroid is often cited as a potential cause of the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event (stock image).

This caused earthquakes and landslides in the region as far as Argentina.

However, although there were waves and eruptions, the creatures of the time were not suffering from waves, but the heat was much worse.

While investigating the incident, researchers discovered small rock particles and other debris shot into the air when the asteroid crashed.

These tiny particles, called spheres, covered the planet with a thick layer of soot.

Experts explain that losing light from the sun completely collapses the underwater system.

This is because almost all the aquatic food chain’s phytoplankton base would have been removed.

It is believed that more than 180 million years of evolution that brought the world to the point of the Cretaceous period was destroyed in less time than the lifetime of a Tyrannosaurus Rex, equivalent to about 20 to 30 years.

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