Why glacier in Alps turned pink with ‘watermelon snow’

You may have heard of pink sand beaches, but what about “pink snow”?

On Thursday, a local scientist discovered a glacier in the Italian Alps is covered in pink snow. The effect, also known as “watermelon snow,” is due to the presence of algae. 

Though pink snow is actually common in the Alps in the summer (and has been spotted in various locations around the world), researcher Biagio Di Mauro said the color of this cache is even more intense than usual. 

“There was quite an impressive bloom of snow algae,” Di Mauro, of the Institute of Polar Sciences at Italy’s National Research Council, told CNN about his visit to the Presena glacier.

This season’s low snowfall and high atmospheric temperatures “creates the perfect environment for the algae to grow,” he told CNN, and the presence of hikers and ski lifts may also have had an impact on the algae growth, he told The Guardian.

And though the effect may be beautiful to look at, “it is for sure bad for the glacier,” Di Mauro told CNN, as darker snow absorbs more heat and therefore melts faster. 

While Di Mauro is still testing the pink snow, he believes the algae responsible is a snow algae called Chlamydomonas nivalis.

Researcher Biagio Di Mauro takes samples of pink colored snow on the top of the Presena glacier in Italy.

Miguel MEDINA / AFP via Getty Images

Presena glacier with pink-colored snow

Photo by MIGUEL MEDINA/AFP via Getty Images

Photo by Miguel MEDINA / AFP via Getty Images

Presena glacier near Pellizzano, Italy, covered in pink-colored snow, an affect that is due to the presence of algae

Photo by MIGUEL MEDINA/AFP via Getty Images

Photo by MIGUEL MEDINA/AFP via Getty Images

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Why glacier in Alps turned pink with ‘watermelon snow’

Why glacier in Alps turned pink with 'watermelon snow'

You could have heard of pink sand seashores, but what about “pink snow”?

On Thursday, a regional scientist discovered a glacier in the Italian Alps is covered in pink snow. The impact, also recognised as “watermelon snow,” is because of to the presence of algae. 

Though pink snow is essentially frequent in the Alps in the summer time (and has been spotted in different destinations all-around the world), researcher Biagio Di Mauro said the shade of this cache is even far more intensive than normal. 

“There was really an impressive bloom of snow algae,” Di Mauro, of the Institute of Polar Sciences at Italy’s Nationwide Analysis Council, informed CNN about his pay a visit to to the Presena glacier.

This season’s small snowfall and substantial atmospheric temperatures “produces the great natural environment for the algae to improve,” he informed CNN, and the presence of hikers and ski lifts may perhaps also have had an effects on the algae growth, he advised The Guardian.

And while the outcome could be stunning to appear at, “it is for positive terrible for the glacier,” Di Mauro told CNN, as darker snow absorbs much more warmth and therefore melts more quickly. 

Whilst Di Mauro is however testing the pink snow, he believes the algae accountable is a snow algae named Chlamydomonas nivalis.

Researcher Biagio Di Mauro will take samples of pink colored snow on the top of the Presena glacier in Italy.

Miguel MEDINA / AFP by way of Getty Photos

Presena glacier with pink-colored snow

Picture by MIGUEL MEDINA/AFP by way of Getty Images

Picture by Miguel MEDINA / AFP by way of Getty Visuals

Presena glacier around Pellizzano, Italy, protected in pink-coloured snow, an have an affect on that is because of to the existence of algae

Photo by MIGUEL MEDINA/AFP by way of Getty Photos

Photo by MIGUEL MEDINA/AFP by using Getty Pictures

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About the Author: Max Grant

Devoted web lover. Food expert. Hardcore twitter maven. Thinker. Freelance organizer. Social media enthusiast. Creator. Beer buff.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *